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Archive for August, 2010

Snap Shot: Nicholas [yes that is her name] Murray married John Kinner ¬†3 February 1764 in Kirkudbright, Scotland. Because she has an unusual name it was easier to find at least 4 of their children in Parish Registers in Kirkudbright. Women in a number of countries continued to use their maiden names for business and this was true for Nicholas. I was able to find Nicholas Murray on a ‘List of Emigrant shipped on board the Adventure of Liverpool’. The ship record was 10 May 1774. Listed are John Kinner age 30, Nicholas Murray age 33, and three of their children, Anthony Kinner age 10 , Eliz. Kinner age 7, and Nicholas Kinner age 4. Their oldest son John was either deceased or traveled earlier. The family first settled in Bergen County New Jersey.

Immigration records are one place you can find the name of a female ancestor. You may not get her maiden name, which I did with Nicholas, however, when an immigration record is located it will give you at least her first name, age, and who she was traveling with. You will, of course, know the port she left from, but that may not have been where she lived. Some immigration records will also tell you where a person previously lived, and what their destination within the United States was. To find the time period you will have to do some sifting. Start with a timeline of your missing grandmother, look at where and when her children were born and focus in on the time period she most likely came. Then try a search on http://www.stevemorse.org, for your most comprehensive search of immigration databases. This search is free and searches the 5 major ports, ¬†Ellis Island, Castle Garden, plus the 70+ lesser known ports of entry. Other good places to look for immigration records are http://www.immigrantships.net which also is free and of course Filby’s Index which is on Ancestry.com.

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